RESTAURANTS

RYU ZUSHI

Off-duty fishermen and chefs done with their morning shopping make up the first wave of customers at this counter-only sushi joint in Tsukiji's outer market. You won't hear a long story about how the rice is prepared and seasoned here; nor will the chef explain the provenance of each ingredient.

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SUSHI SHO

Sushi Sho's pebble-lined entrance, cool tones, and paper-covered screens remind us of a tea ceremony room, as does the calm feeling that washes over us as we cross the threshold.

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SUSHI SAITO

Takahashi Saito is a master of subtlety and balance. The bonito sashimi is always outstanding, as is the tender simmered octopus. Mild red vinegar and the perfect amount of salt give punch to the shari rice, which is never too big or too packed together. The kuruma-ebi shrimp is a plump and juicy specimen that we could eat all the time.

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SUSHI TAKE

One of Tokyo's few female sushi chefs, Takeuchi trained at Sushi Shimizu in Shimbashi and caused a stir when she opened her own place in 2014, despite being as precise with technique and meticulous about sourcing her fish as her male counterparts. She sticks to a traditional style, and the bites are balanced and beautiful.

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ISANA

Chef Junichi Onuki is the opposite of the strict sushi-chef stereotype portrayed in movies like Jiro Dreams of Sushi.

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TAKU

The food here is all on point (as it should be, considering the two Michelin stars), but we especially like Ishizaka's beautifully crafted otsumami small bites that go beyond the usual grilled and simmered fish dishes common to other sushi-ya.

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